How does your pace measure up against other runners?

Hello, happy Tuesday. How are you today?

This morning I slept in a little bit because it was raining. I got up at 6:30 instead of my usual 5am and sometime around 8 I went for an easy 6 miler around the neighborhood. It was slow and easy and it felt pretty good except for the searing pain in my quads but hey, a little quad pain never killed anybody….that I know. I’m not really sure where the soreness came from but you don’t think it could be overtraining or anything….

Whaaaaat?Nah! Not that.

Anywho, while I was out punishing my quads I was thinking about how I used to obsess over my time when I first started running and how for years I was overly concerned with how fast each mile was. I would always wonder how I measured up to other runners. I mean it’s pretty obvious in local races when you see the results but I mean, I wondered overall. I knew I would never be the fastest runner and I knew I wasn’t the slowest either, but I wanted to know the big picture. And that’s when I started looking around for some type of accurate measurement.

fast runners

Enter the age graded calculator.

The age graded calculator helps you judge your performance by using a percentage without bias for your age or gender. You’re measured against a specific standard for your age and sex. Here is what the percentages are interpreted as:

100% – World Record Level

Over 90% – World Class

Over 80% – National Class

Over 70% – Regional Class

Over 60% – Local Class

When I first looked at the calculator I was depressed until I realized I was comparing myself against all runners, elite athletes included.

OMG

These days I come in at around 60-65% for most of the distances. Not bad, because when I first started using this calculator I was around 45-50%.

You can find the age graded calculator here. But don’t stress out over it because you’re comparing yourself against some of the best runners in the world.

If you want to know how you measure up against average runners, check out this calculator. You can enter in your latest race times for any race from a 5K to a full marathon and it will tell you how you measure up against average runners. I personally think this calculator is more accurate for the average runner.

That’s all I got for tonite.

Do you ever worry about how fast your pace is compared to other runners?

11 thoughts on “How does your pace measure up against other runners?

  1. I am so guilty of this to the point where it becomes a detriment sometimes. I do better when I just focus on running my race/pace and not worrying about what other people around me are doing, but sometimes it’s just so hard not to and sometimes I actually think it’s a good thing if it pushes or motivates you in a good way rather than making you feel pressure. I’m still working on finding that balance though..:)

    • I hear ya. I feel the same way. I’ve been running for so long now that I like to use the numbers just to gage where I am. It’s good to look back and see how far you’ve come or how far you need to go 🙂

  2. Thanks so much for sharing this. I don’t tend to compare myself to elite athletes, but I do compare myself to blogging runners which is just as bad because many have been running for years or their whole life. I’m excited that I’m at 47% because that’s around where you said you started, so I look forward to continuing to run and improve!

    • And you will! That’s the best part. If you keep running the only way to go is up, you’ll get better and better and it’s good to look back every so often just to see how far you’be come. Good luck to you, you’ll be at 60 and then 70 before you know it 😉

    • Great point, when people used to ask me how fast I run, I’d say, I’m not about speed, I’m all about endurance and it still holds true to this day.

  3. I do tend to compare my pace with women in my age group. I’m sure lots of women (and men) do too. But running becomes much more enjoyable when we realize we are all different and are in different levels in running and fitness. I did find the calculators very interesting tho! Thanks for sharing!

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